close
Life as a Medic

Dr Zahraa’s life as a Medic

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Dr. Zahraa Akbar, currently pursuing a career in Obstetrics and Gynaecology in Kuwait is a graduate of the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, and also holds a Masters Degree in Human Clinical Embryology and Assisted Conception from the University of Dundee

In this article, she gives us a glimpse into what everyday life as a medic is for her. From a typical morning waking up at 6 am, to hospital rounds and on- calls, to leisure, volunteering and how she unwinds at the end of each day.

Being a doctor provides endless opportunities to help others regardless of age and circumstances. I do not come from a family of doctors. My father is a manager and my mother is an Art teacher. However, I knew that medicine was the career for me. I cannot imagine a more rewarding and satisfying profession.

Throughout medical school, I was keen on furthering my passion through a career in Obstetrics and Gynaecology, and my decision was finally solidified after my fourth-year clinical rotation when I performed my first delivery and assisted in the OT. I knew I had found my place and specialism.

 

I cannot imagine a more rewarding and satisfying profession

 

So what is it like working as a doctor?

I am currently working at the Maternity Hospital, Obstetrics and Gynecology department in Kuwait. Generally, I get up early around 6:00 am. I do not like to have my breakfast until 9 am, but coffee is essential. I have to be at the hospital by 7:15 am, attending the Morning Meeting where on-call cases are presented. Following that, I perform my patients’ round, examine them and plan the next step of care and treatment.

My usual working day depends on the hospital unit schedule and my unit schedule is:

  • Sunday: Outpatient clinic that starts at 8:30 am
  • Monday: Ground round starts at 8:30 am
  • Tuesday: Operation Theatre starts at 7:30 am
  • Wednesday: Outpatient clinic starts at 8:30 am
  • Thursday: Labor day starts 7:30 am

 

My working day ends at 2 pm depending on the schedule. I come back home, have lunch with my family and relax for an hour. I then work on my research or read recent studies related to my career. Basically, I love to keep myself busy. After that, I have my dinner and relax, which usually involves chatting with my sisters and doing my skin care regimen. I love looking after myself. I go to bed around 10:00- 11:00 pm with my laptop, normally watching a program or TV series to relax and switch off and this is where my day ends.

 

Being a doctor provides endless opportunities to help others regardless of age and circumstances.

 

Additionally, there are on-call shifts I attend every fifth day. On-call shifts are divided into two; day shift from 1:00 pm to 7:00 pm and then from 4:00 am to 7:00 am and the night shift starts from 7:00 pm to 4:00 am. We are obliged to take an alternating shift. On-calls trained me to work for long hours without taking breaks.

I love looking after myself…

Outside the hospital, I enjoy traveling to different countries and exploring other cultures as well as getting involved in volunteering my skills to help others.

My most recent venture was with a Heartsaver campaign here in Kuwait where a few of my colleagues and I trained 2,000 people on how to perform CPR. I love the beach life, it’s relaxing. I also love to socialize with friends, go shopping and decorate my room (which by the way, I always receive compliments for).

I greatly enjoy my role as a medical doctor.

Dr Zahraa Akbar

The author Dr Zahraa Akbar

Dr. Akbar, currently pursuing a career in Obstetrics and Gynaecology is a graduate of the Royal College of Surgeons Ireland, and also holds a Masters degree in Human Clinical Embryology and Assisted Conception from the University of Dundee.

5 Comments

  1. Hi
    It would have been lovely to know also how she is doing in IVF and assisted conception precisely.

  2. Hi,

    Regarding Assisted Conception, It is a one year Master in Human Clinical Embryology and Assisted Conception which is a taught master involves 3 terms in total; the first term involves assignments, lab and exams, the second term involves assignments and thesis training and the third term involves working on thesis.
    If you require any further information regarding Human reproduction; clinical or embryology part please just ask

    Thanks

  3. Hi Samuel

    Regarding IVF and Assisted Conception, It is a one year master in Human Clinical Embryology and Assisted Conception which involves 3 terms in total. The first term involved exams, assignments and lab. The second term involved assignments, lab and thesis training and the last term involved working on the thesis.

    If you require any further information regarding Human Reproduction; Clinical or Embryology part, please do not hesitate to contact me.

  4. Hi Samuel

    Regarding IVF and Assisted Conception, It is a one year master in Human Clinical Embryology and Assisted Conception which involves 3 terms in total. The first term involved exams, assignments and lab. The second term involved assignments, lab and thesis training and the last term involved working on the thesis.

    If you require any further information regarding Human Reproduction; Clinical or Embryology part, please do not hesitate to contact me.

Leave a Response